FAQs

How do I know if the AAV is working?

The most accurate way to test an AAV is by using a manometer. However this may not be readily available.

Another way is performing a field test in a cup of water, Place the air admittance valve (AAV) in a cup as shown here, on page 4. This creates a positive pressure, which seals the membrane and allows the valve to float. If the AAV allows air to pass through, then the membrane may have compromised, causing the AAV to sink.

How do I install P.A.P.A. and other Studor AAVs?

All installation instructions can be found here.

How does an Air Admittance Valve (AAV) work?

Studor AAVs are designed to open when a fixture is discharging to allow air to enter the system. They are designed to close by gravity when there is no flow in the system to prevent the escape of sewer gas into the building. Click here for more information.

How do I install an AAV with a sewer ejector/ejector pit?

Studor AAVs can be installed with a sewer ejector/ejector pit. To view instructions for a sewer ejector/ejector pit, click here.

How do I install an AAV with a grease trap?

Studor AAVs can be installed with a grease trap. To view instructions for a grease trap, click here.

How do I install an AAV with an island sink?

Studor AAVs can be installed with an island sink. To view instructions for an island sink, click here.

How do I install an AAV with a sump pump?

Studor AAVs can be installed with a sump pump. To view instructions for a sump pump, click here.

Can I replace all open vent pipes with AAVs?

No. There must be one pipe to open atmosphere for each building’s drainage system.

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